Course Profile (DACUM)

PIDP 3210 – Curriculum Development
Vancouver Community College
Kathryn Truant
October 17, 2016

A DACUM is an acronym for Designing a Curriculum

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Examples of PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES (USING A SIMULATED PATIENT)

 A2

TO PREVENT DRUG AND ALLERGIC REACTIONS DURING SURGERY, DEMONSTRATE THE PREOPERATIVE PHASE BY REVIEWING A PATIENT’S HEALTH HISTORY FOR MEDICATIONS AND ALLERGIES.

A6

FOLLOWING AN ORAL SURGERY PROCEDURE, DEMONSTRATE THE POSTOPERATIVE PHASE BY APPLYING GAUZE DRESSING AND ICE IN ORDER TO CONTROL BLEEDING AND SWELLING.

B1

AN ORAL SURGEON INDICATES THE EXTRACTION OF AN ABSCESSED TOOTH; IDENTIFY THE LEVEL OF STERILITY BASED ON PROCEDURE, IN ORDER TO FOLLOW THE PROPER STERILE PROTOCOL.

 B4

THE EXTRACTION OF IMPACTED TEETH INVOLVES THE INVASION OF BONE; DEMONSTRATE THE STERILE SET-UP OF A SURGICAL SUITE BY SCRUBBING HANDS AND DONNING STERILE GLOVES.

 C2

WHEN ASSISTING FOR THE EXTRACTION OF IMPACTED TEETH, SELECT APPROPRIATE INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT BY CREATING A CHECKLIST.

C5

DURING AN EXTRACTION PROCEDURE WHERE THE PATIENT IS SEDATED, DEMONSTRATE PERIOPOERATIVE CARE BY ENSURING THAT THE PATIENT IS NPOPRIOR TO SURGERY, PLACING A MOIST THROAT PACK TO PREVENT THE ASPIRATION OF EXTRACTED TEETH DURING SURGERY, AND MONITORING THE PATIENT’S RECOVERY FOLLOWING SURGERY.

D3

WHEN AN ORAL SURGEON INDICATES BIOPSY, SET UP FOR BIOPSY BY ORGANIZING THE SPECIMEN CONTAINER FOR LABORATORY PROCESSING.

 D6

WHEN A PATIENT IS UNDERGOING A BIOPSY, DEMONSTRATE PERIOPERATIVE CARE THROUGHOUT BY REASSURING THE PATIENT.

 E1

WHEN ASSISTING IN GRAFTING PROCEDURES, DETERMINE THE STERILE PROTOCOL FOR GRAFTS BY DETERMINING IF IMPLANTABLE MEDICAL DEVICES WILL BE PLACED.

F2

WHEN ASSISTING IN IMPLANTOLOGY, SELECT APPROPRIATE INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT BY NAMING AND VERIFYING IMPLANT SYSTEMS FREQUENTLY USED.

COURSE PROFILE RATIONALE:

Needs Assessment for an Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Module for Certified Dental Assistants:

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMS) is briefly discussed in accredited Certified Dental Assistant (CDA) programs. Other dental specialties, including Orthodontics and Prosthodontics, are included in a similar capacity as well. However, comprehensive and clinical modules following graduation from a CDA program exist to prepare a CDA for the above-mentioned specialties, but not in Oral Surgery. An OMS assistant must be a CDA, and must have advanced knowledge and skill in patient assessment and monitoring, surgical asepsis, specialized instruments, and surgical procedures. Most procedures performed in an OMS clinic also require the patients to be sedated. The College of Dental Surgeons of BC requires CDA’s who work in sedation facilities to complete a Sedation Module to assist in the administering of anesthesia and to be part of the sedation team, but the foundational skills of the OMS specialty are not covered in the Sedation Module.

I confirmed the gap in OMS education and training for CDA’s because of my own personal experience, by interviewing recent CDA graduates, and by interviewing an instructor from the Dental Assisting Program at Okanagan College. I had twenty years of experience as a CDA in a general dentistry practice prior to advancing into my current position in an OMS specialty practice. My previous experience, and my acquired Sedation Module still left gaps that I had to learn on the job, and it was a steep learning curve simply because there were new surgical procedures that I was expected to learn quickly and effectively. I have been in the specialty for ten years now, and feel very competent and confident in designing the content of a new curriculum.

To summarize, in terms of content, my DACUM’s goals outline procedures that I did not learn in college, and that are rarely performed in a general dentistry practice. In addition, in the province of BC, a CDA must obtain 36 hours of continuing education every 3 years. There is opportunity for continuing education at dental conferences and conventions throughout the province, but there has not been a course, workshop, or module offered specifically for CDA’s entering Oral Surgery. An Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Module would provide the advanced knowledge necessary for a CDA to enter the specialty, and provide a professional development opportunity for CDA’s currently working in an Oral Surgery clinic.

Educational Approach to an Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Module for Certified Dental Assistants:

I chose the Competency Based Education (CBE) approach to curriculum design because I am basing my module on the foundational skills of Oral Surgery for CDA’s. It is not a beginner course, but it is a course that introduces new skills, procedures, and systems, with the prerequisite of being a CDA to take the course. It is a step-by-step course that focuses on developing specific competencies. My method attempts to start where most CDA’s enter the specialty: basic patient care, and sterile procedure before assisting the surgeon. I didn’t begin my career in Oral Surgery by assisting in surgery; I had to build the knowledge (information), skills (competence), and attitude (confidence) first to ensure the safety of the patient and the surgical team. My module follows a sequence that I believe develops through this scope and scale. I intended my objectives to follow that same process of reviewing perioperative care and the sterile procedure specific to each goal, and progressing through the goals as the degree of difficulty and assigned duties progress in a real Oral Surgery practice. The perioperative care, level of sterility and selection of appropriate instruments and equipment are discrete for each surgical procedure as well.

Alignment of the Need, Instructional Activity, and Assessment of a Performance Objective from an Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Module for Certified Dental Assistants:

C2 WHEN ASSISTING FOR THE EXTRACTION OF IMPACTED TEETH, SELECT APPROPRIATE INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT BY CREATING A CHECKLIST.

For a CDA to select the appropriate instrumentation for the extraction of impacted teeth, an instructor must provide the information required to accomplish the task. The learner needs to know what to prepare: a description of what an assistant must organize as a result of instruction. Having students create checklists draws on the instruction that they are receiving, as well as their own past professional experiences. Checklists leave little room for error, and it gives the student something concrete to refer to as they learn. Further, with checklists assessment is clear, and learners can self-assess and collaborate with their colleagues. This type of skill will increase the competencies required on the job, and as the student continues to learn.