🎬Me & My Survey Monkey® (Round Two)

Alas, YouTube© has blocked my video. But that’s okay because Vimeo™+© is now supporting my school project. I have the utmost respect for an artist’s work, and would never use content without attribution or for commercial use. I didn’t want to remove the Beatles’ song because it works well with my film (and I love the song). The video isn’t even that great, but the hype surrounding it has become interesting and controversial!

🎬Me & My Survey Monkey®

Making an instructional video is challenging and time consuming. It is also a lot of fun! However, the content of the film almost becomes secondary to its production. The video is part of a digital assignment in the Provincial Instructor Diploma Program at Vancouver Community College. The criteria was to highlight a strategy used to solicit student feedback on the instructional process. I chose to feature online instructor feedback forms with the help of Survey Monkey. I made the video using  QuickTime® on my 2011 MacBook Air® and iMovie®. I uploaded the video to YouTube©. I guess EMI® isn’t happy with me using a Beatles’ song because YouTube instantly sent me a warning and threatened to block my video! I am disputing YouTube’s decision under the ‘fair dealing exception’ in the Copyright Act because my video is for educational purposes only. I hope my dispute holds, and I hope you enjoy my amateur production. Please keep in mind that I’m a dental assistant and a fledgling educator, and not a film maker.

Wait for it . . .

I’ve learned a lot about making a movie since my last post, and have probably spent way too much time playing around with software, but I’m in my happy place because I’m very comfortable around technology. I wish my movies reflected my drive. None-the-less, my ‘soon to be released’ instructional video has its own trailer! I know what you’re thinking: I should be working on actual course work. I can justify this diversion because I am still learning. I just hope my forthcoming video lives up to all the ‘hype’. Enjoy the preview 🙂

 

🎵 A special thank to the late and great Chuck Berry for his contribution to the world (and my movie trailer)

Semi Pro🎥

PIDP 3260 Assignment 5 is a digital project showcasing a feedback strategy designed to assess instruction. I can assure you from experience that the digital project will take longer to create than my feedback instrument, and my project will look amateur, unless I step up my game!

In the Mid-Course Formative Questionnaire, I complained about relying on student exemplars in the form of amateur videos for direction throughout the PIDP. My goal in Assignment 5 is to feature a digital instructor feedback instrument that will improve my instruction, AND to learn how to create a professional looking tutorial video, that will also improve my instruction.

For previous PIDP digital assignments, I relied on the Faculty Focus website for direction. 10 Tips for Creating Effective Instructional Videos is great resource, and I especially love the ‘bonus tip’ (Smedshammer, 2017).

While ‘surfing the net’ for more tips on making tutorial videos, I stumbled upon this DIY video on how to make a DIY video. Very entertaining and informative🍹 (Pull My Focus, 2017).

Stay tuned for my video 🐵 : I plan on ‘releasing’ it sometime this coming weekend!

References:

Pull My Focus. (2017, June 6). Make Your Videos Look Professional: 6 Editing Tips to Create Great How To Videos . YouTube. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=haOe_yqciEc

Smedshammer, M. (2017, March 31). 10 Tips for Creating Effective Instructional Videos. Faculty Focus. Retrieved from
https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-with-technology-articles/10-tips-creating-effective-instructional-videos/

Creative Lecturing

Lecturing Creatively

3260 Professional Practice Blog (Week 7): Brookfield, Chapter 6

In my line of work, lecturing is an important component of theory introduction. I can assign readings, have learners watch videos, enact demonstrations, and stimulate discussion, but ultimately I need to spend time describing content to my learners in the form of a lecture. This is not to say that a combination of the above cannot be combined with a good lecture. Stephen Brookfield (2015) writes that, “the challenge is to make our lectures as helpful, enlivening, and critically stimulating as possible” (p. 70): I want to add memorable to this list.

I recently taught a class for the first time on a topic that is critical to healthcare: Preventing Healthcare Associated Infections. I talked about the pathogens that can survive on hard surfaces in the dental office, and the importance of a proper sterile technique. Brookfield outlines the reasons for lecturing (2015) and unbeknownst to me at the time, I followed his directives:

– introduce material (aka: objective and goal of lecture)

– explain difficult or abstract concepts (pathogens are microscopic!)

– introduce alternative interpretations (acknowledge diverse learning styles)

– model intellectual attitudes and expectations (place value on the topic)

– encourage learners’ interest (keep them entertained!)

The entertainment portion of my lecture consisted of student volunteers blowing whistles every time I contaminated something (touched something that I wasn’t supposed to touch) in a mock operatory. I managed to stump the students once, and they also ‘blew the whistle’ on me numerous times. Brookfield argues that deconstructing what an instructor has previously communicated is key to understanding; I also hope my demonstration was memorable and engaging.

Brookfield states that “varying the communication styles and modalities you use in a lecture has long been argued as an essential component of good practice” (2015, p. 73). I agree. I came across this fantastic website on how to engage learners during PIDP 3250 (Instructional Strategies): Tecknologic – Learn. Try. Share. It is a fantastic resource with free downloads for many virtual games that can supplement a lecture. The latest download is a Power Point spinning wheel that can be customized. A vocabulary review is one suggestion, and it looks like fun! And, what a great way for learners to remember terminology! Brookfield’s final statement in Chapter 6 will encourage me to continue to incorporate a variety of elements into my future lectures, “Well-situated presentations can be crucial to students’ development as learners” (2015, p. 82).

References:

Brookfield, S. (2015). The Skillful Teacher (3rd ed.).  San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

tecknologic. (2018, April 30). The Spinning Wheel 2018. technologic.wordpress.com. Retrieved from https://tekhnologic.wordpress.com/2018/04/30/the-spinning-wheel-2018/

 

Screen Shot 2018-02-18 at 5.10.45 PM Brookfield forgot to mention how much fun creative lecturing can be for the instructor 🙂

Teaching Tips

IMG_5133

Featured Image: A beautiful waterfall in a rocky canyon flowing into a deep and calm pool

I can stare at a waterfall for hours, mesmerized yet attentive, and surrounded by the freshest air! A great instructor can be a metaphor for a waterfall: powerful and compelling, fluid, and contemporary.

The University of Waterloo Centre for Teaching Excellence is a fantastic resource for instructors, especially the Teaching Tips page.

I love that this resource is available online and available to use without a subscription. The fact that it’s free certainly does not reflect or diminish its quality.

Screen Shot 2018-02-18 at 5.10.45 PM I took the photograph at McRae Creek in Christina Lake British Columbia. I want to be like the waterfall 🙂

Pecha Kucha

I’ve created a Pecha Kucha showcasing digital projects on the topic of Instructional Strategies created by PIDP 3250 students. A Pecha Kucha is a Power Point presentation which incorporates 20 slides, each no more than 20 seconds long. It applies imagery and sound “to create a seamless, memorable, meaningful and concise presentation” (Watanabe-Crockett, 2016, para. 2). I think a Pecha Kucha is a great instructional strategy to introduce new material, or to summarize a lesson. A Pecha Kucha can also be assigned as a project to assess learners. This post is part of an assignment where I had to choose 6 student exemplars of digital projects. As I started viewing the multitude of presentations, I couldn’t narrow my selection down to just 6 projects, and I thought a Pecha Kucha would be interesting and inclusive. The pros of creating a Pecha Kucha is that it is an engaging technology. The cons is that creating a Pecha Kucha is time-consuming (my short video took hours to create). None-the-less, I plan on using Pecha Kucha in my professional practice because I love cool technology, as well as trying out some of the instructional strategies portrayed in my presentation.

Enjoy

🙂 I would like to thank the students who shared their projects so that I could create My Pecha Kutcha. The links to their full presentations can be found on my Resources page.

I would also like to thank the Black Keys (Auerbach & Carney, 2010)