Category Archives: Technology

🎬Me & My Survey Monkey® (Round Two)

Alas, YouTube© has blocked my video. But that’s okay because Vimeo™+© is now supporting my school project. I have the utmost respect for an artist’s work, and would never use content without attribution or for commercial use. I didn’t want to remove the Beatles’ song because it works well with my film (and I love the song). The video isn’t even that great, but the hype surrounding it has become interesting and controversial!

🎬Me & My Survey Monkey®

Making an instructional video is challenging and time consuming. It is also a lot of fun! However, the content of the film almost becomes secondary to its production. The video is part of a digital assignment in the Provincial Instructor Diploma Program at Vancouver Community College. The criteria was to highlight a strategy used to solicit student feedback on the instructional process. I chose to feature online instructor feedback forms with the help of Survey Monkey. I made the video using  QuickTime® on my 2011 MacBook Air® and iMovie®. I uploaded the video to YouTube©. I guess EMI® isn’t happy with me using a Beatles’ song because YouTube instantly sent me a warning and threatened to block my video! I am disputing YouTube’s decision under the ‘fair dealing exception’ in the Copyright Act because my video is for educational purposes only. I hope my dispute holds, and I hope you enjoy my amateur production. Please keep in mind that I’m a dental assistant and a fledgling educator, and not a film maker.

Wait for it . . .

I’ve learned a lot about making a movie since my last post, and have probably spent way too much time playing around with software, but I’m in my happy place because I’m very comfortable around technology. I wish my movies reflected my drive. None-the-less, my ‘soon to be released’ instructional video has its own trailer! I know what you’re thinking: I should be working on actual course work. I can justify this diversion because I am still learning. I just hope my forthcoming video lives up to all the ‘hype’. Enjoy the preview 🙂

 

🎵 A special thank to the late and great Chuck Berry for his contribution to the world (and my movie trailer)

Semi Pro🎥

PIDP 3260 Assignment 5 is a digital project showcasing a feedback strategy designed to assess instruction. I can assure you from experience that the digital project will take longer to create than my feedback instrument, and my project will look amateur, unless I step up my game!

In the Mid-Course Formative Questionnaire, I complained about relying on student exemplars in the form of amateur videos for direction throughout the PIDP. My goal in Assignment 5 is to feature a digital instructor feedback instrument that will improve my instruction, AND to learn how to create a professional looking tutorial video, that will also improve my instruction.

For previous PIDP digital assignments, I relied on the Faculty Focus website for direction. 10 Tips for Creating Effective Instructional Videos is great resource, and I especially love the ‘bonus tip’ (Smedshammer, 2017).

While ‘surfing the net’ for more tips on making tutorial videos, I stumbled upon this DIY video on how to make a DIY video. Very entertaining and informative🍹 (Pull My Focus, 2017).

Stay tuned for my video 🐵 : I plan on ‘releasing’ it sometime this coming weekend!

References:

Pull My Focus. (2017, June 6). Make Your Videos Look Professional: 6 Editing Tips to Create Great How To Videos . YouTube. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=haOe_yqciEc

Smedshammer, M. (2017, March 31). 10 Tips for Creating Effective Instructional Videos. Faculty Focus. Retrieved from
https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-with-technology-articles/10-tips-creating-effective-instructional-videos/

Creative Lecturing

Lecturing Creatively

3260 Professional Practice Blog (Week 7): Brookfield, Chapter 6

In my line of work, lecturing is an important component of theory introduction. I can assign readings, have learners watch videos, enact demonstrations, and stimulate discussion, but ultimately I need to spend time describing content to my learners in the form of a lecture. This is not to say that a combination of the above cannot be combined with a good lecture. Stephen Brookfield (2015) writes that, “the challenge is to make our lectures as helpful, enlivening, and critically stimulating as possible” (p. 70): I want to add memorable to this list.

I recently taught a class for the first time on a topic that is critical to healthcare: Preventing Healthcare Associated Infections. I talked about the pathogens that can survive on hard surfaces in the dental office, and the importance of a proper sterile technique. Brookfield outlines the reasons for lecturing (2015) and unbeknownst to me at the time, I followed his directives:

– introduce material (aka: objective and goal of lecture)

– explain difficult or abstract concepts (pathogens are microscopic!)

– introduce alternative interpretations (acknowledge diverse learning styles)

– model intellectual attitudes and expectations (place value on the topic)

– encourage learners’ interest (keep them entertained!)

The entertainment portion of my lecture consisted of student volunteers blowing whistles every time I contaminated something (touched something that I wasn’t supposed to touch) in a mock operatory. I managed to stump the students once, and they also ‘blew the whistle’ on me numerous times. Brookfield argues that deconstructing what an instructor has previously communicated is key to understanding; I also hope my demonstration was memorable and engaging.

Brookfield states that “varying the communication styles and modalities you use in a lecture has long been argued as an essential component of good practice” (2015, p. 73). I agree. I came across this fantastic website on how to engage learners during PIDP 3250 (Instructional Strategies): Tecknologic – Learn. Try. Share. It is a fantastic resource with free downloads for many virtual games that can supplement a lecture. The latest download is a Power Point spinning wheel that can be customized. A vocabulary review is one suggestion, and it looks like fun! And, what a great way for learners to remember terminology! Brookfield’s final statement in Chapter 6 will encourage me to continue to incorporate a variety of elements into my future lectures, “Well-situated presentations can be crucial to students’ development as learners” (2015, p. 82).

References:

Brookfield, S. (2015). The Skillful Teacher (3rd ed.).  San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

tecknologic. (2018, April 30). The Spinning Wheel 2018. technologic.wordpress.com. Retrieved from https://tekhnologic.wordpress.com/2018/04/30/the-spinning-wheel-2018/

 

Screen Shot 2018-02-18 at 5.10.45 PM Brookfield forgot to mention how much fun creative lecturing can be for the instructor 🙂

Teaching Tips

IMG_5133

Featured Image: A beautiful waterfall in a rocky canyon flowing into a deep and calm pool

I can stare at a waterfall for hours, mesmerized yet attentive, and surrounded by the freshest air! A great instructor can be a metaphor for a waterfall: powerful and compelling, fluid, and contemporary.

The University of Waterloo Centre for Teaching Excellence is a fantastic resource for instructors, especially the Teaching Tips page.

I love that this resource is available online and available to use without a subscription. The fact that it’s free certainly does not reflect or diminish its quality.

Screen Shot 2018-02-18 at 5.10.45 PM I took the photograph at McRae Creek in Christina Lake British Columbia. I want to be like the waterfall 🙂

Pecha Kucha

I’ve created a Pecha Kucha showcasing digital projects on the topic of Instructional Strategies created by PIDP 3250 students. A Pecha Kucha is a Power Point presentation which incorporates 20 slides, each no more than 20 seconds long. It applies imagery and sound “to create a seamless, memorable, meaningful and concise presentation” (Watanabe-Crockett, 2016, para. 2). I think a Pecha Kucha is a great instructional strategy to introduce new material, or to summarize a lesson. A Pecha Kucha can also be assigned as a project to assess learners. This post is part of an assignment where I had to choose 6 student exemplars of digital projects. As I started viewing the multitude of presentations, I couldn’t narrow my selection down to just 6 projects, and I thought a Pecha Kucha would be interesting and inclusive. The pros of creating a Pecha Kucha is that it is an engaging technology. The cons is that creating a Pecha Kucha is time-consuming (my short video took hours to create). None-the-less, I plan on using Pecha Kucha in my professional practice because I love cool technology, as well as trying out some of the instructional strategies portrayed in my presentation.

Enjoy

🙂 I would like to thank the students who shared their projects so that I could create My Pecha Kutcha. The links to their full presentations can be found on my Resources page.

I would also like to thank the Black Keys (Auerbach & Carney, 2010)

 

What is Real?

Featured Image: Bare tree bathed in fresh snow against a clear blue sky

Virtual reality, my favourite oxymoron. But how do you define real? Technology has changed our world forever. A Luddite[1] will argue that the physical quality of education is lost in a digital environment. I wholeheartedly disagree with the Luddite’s mentality, and I want to talk about how digital media enhances LEARNING. A digitally enriched environment creates a more authentic learning experience in my opinion.

For example, what difference does it make in a learning environment whether the lesson is hands-on or virtual? They’re both simulated, they both allow for mistakes and practice, and they both contribute to mastery.

I took the picture of the snowy tree this morning. The snow on the tree is special because it captures something momentary. Every intricate branch and twig was bathed in fresh snow, and the sky was so blue that I had to photograph it. The picture isn’t real; it’s just a snapshot of a moment in time – you can’t touch the tree or the snow. But, I needed to capture the image so that I could remember it exactly how it was! I am struck by the similarity of using technology to clarify and capture an intended lesson, which learners can refer to in case they can’t remember all the intricate points of a class.

As I wrap up PIDP 3240 Media Enhanced Learning (please check out my assignments), I’m driven and inspired by the verb, ‘enhanced.’ Technology does not replace an in-class experience, or diminish an online environment in comparison; it simply captures and improves the quality of a learning moment.

So, what difference does it make if education is derived in a ‘real’ live environment? Instruction, demonstration, practice and application can take place in a ‘virtual’ environment as well. A slideshow, video, online game, or a field trip on a sunny day following a snowstorm are all genuine ways to learn.

Luddites are fighting a losing battle, because we all win when information is documented and shared, and not just described as being ‘real.’

[1] A person opposed to technology